I am still learning.

Thoughts and Ideas

Who is the most influential corporate governance tweeter in 2013 ?

Posted by Estelle Metayer on 23 April 2013 | 7 Comments

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For the third year, this article summarizes the results of the ranking of the most influential experts on Twitter debating corporate governance issues and trends. There are quite a few new faces this year in the TOP 25, an illustration of the dynamism of this community.

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Is Your Board Suffering from Blindspots?

Posted by Estelle Metayer on 20 March 2013 | 1 Comments

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One of the most difficult habits to develop in learning to drive a car is to beware of blindspots – that area along the periphery of the car where we cannot see what’s happening. Despite the rear-view and side mirrors, there remains an annoying small area where passing vehicles or pedestrians cannot be seen. If you neglect your blindspots when changing lanes or turning, you put yourself and your car in jeopardy.  Blindspots are an apt metaphor for many kinds of errors and misjudgments that boards of directors can make—mistakes that can be costly to their company. No matter how experienced, intelligent or well-educated directors might be, blindspots can create costly errors in oversight and decision-making.

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Who is the most influential corporate governance tweeter in 2012 ?

Posted by Estelle Metayer on 3 June 2012 | 2 Comments

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Last year, I wrote a blog that summarized the most influencial experts on Twitter discussing corporate governance. One year later, let's look at what has changed and analyze how the corporate governance community is shaping up on Twitter.

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Boards of directors: less oversight, more foresight?

Posted by Estelle Metayer on 28 February 2012 | 1 Comments

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With the revelation of each new failure caused by  "strategic short-sightedness," as illustrated by the recent Kodak, HP, RIM and Blockbuster failures, companies must rethink their governance systems and in particular the role of the board of directors.

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"Because I Dare" - Women on Boards

Posted by Estelle Metayer on 18 October 2011 | 4 Comments

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As women flooded the "Women on Boards Bootcamp" sessions at the Women's Forum which took place in Deauville this week, I could not help but reflect that the pool of women candidates willing to sit on boards was indeed rich, diverse, and experienced."Because I dare" could best summarize the discussions - and the general mood: women need to take a much more aggressive approach if they want to set foot in the boardroom. They need to gain self confidence to seek out those board positions, leverage their relevant experiences in governance, and stop to be simply waiting for the opportunities to be presented to them.

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When Social Media Matters: a Guide to the Board of Directors for better Governance

Posted by Estelle Metayer on 8 September 2011 | 2 Comments

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In 2009, the  Deloitte Ethics and Workplace Survey explored attitudes about social networking and pointed out the significance of social media for board of directors. 58 percent of executives felt that the reputational risk associated with social networking should be a board room issue. Yet,  only 17 percent of executives said that they currently had programs in place to monitor and mitigate reputational risks that may arise with social network usage. Boards have since largely left it to management to figure out its social media strategy. When informally asked in a boardroom, Competia found that less than 5% of directors admit having ever used and participated in social media. Mistrust is widespread and the issue of privacy is of utmost concern. The implications of social media for the board far outreach reputation risk. As the use of social media is rapidly spreading and challenging every single company business model and strategy, it is time for directors to understand the implications for corporate governance.

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